Sony commits to 100% renewable electricity

Electronics giant Sony has joined RE100, pledging to use 100 per cent renewable electricity for all its business sites by 2040.

Sony announced on Monday that it has joined RE100, which consists of companies committed to using 100 per cent renewable electricity. So far, over 140 member companies worldwide have joined the international initiative, which is run by The Climate Group in partnership with CDP.

Sony’s European sites already run on 100 per cent renewable electricity. As part of its new sustainability pledge, the electronics giant will expand the use of renewable energy at its locations in North American and China. It will also promote the installation of solar panels at manufacturing sites in Thailand, Japan and elsewhere.

Within Japan, which is home to many of Sony’s semiconductor manufacturing sites and has the largest energy consumption with the Sony Group, the company plans to establish an intra-company electricity transfer plan generated at its sites. It will also consider supplying Sony sites through electrical grids owned by power companies with energy created by in-house generation facilities that use renewable energy such as solar panels.

The latest sustainability pledge fits well with Sony’s “Road to Zero” long-term environmental plan, which plots a course to a zero environmental footprint for the company’s operations and across the lifecycle of its products by 2050.

“For many years, Sony has been an industry leader in actively addressing climate change and other environmental issues,” said Sony president and CEO Kenichiro Yoshida. “By joining RE100, we hope to contribute to the expanded usage of renewable energy not only within Sony but by the industry at large.”

Helen Clarkson, CEO of The Climate Group was pleased to welcome Sony to RE100. “From PlayStation and image sensors to consumer electronics, music, and film, this is the largest entertainment and technology business in the world stepping up and switching its entire operations to 100 per cent renewable electricity.”

Image credit: Pexels via Pixabay

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